It’s all in your head

Because your brain is there. Research shows how the brain functions with memories and emotions.  I learned terms like amygdala hijacking, limbic system, and other parts of the brain.  I learned that smell cuts right to the center of the brain so produces the most powerful PTSD response.  Yes, there are times I look up…

Zentangles

I have the attention span of a gnat when it comes to meditation.  The moment I sit down to meditate or pray I can see the checkered flag waving, the start of the racing thoughts flooding my mind.  Meditation fail.  I am working on an Art therapy online class.  My teacher posted a blog post…

Limit time

One of the interesting things I learned from my counselor was to limit the time I work each day on improving my life with PTSD.  He stressed the importance of setting aside only one hour a day to focus on past, journal writing, studying and other activities focused on healing.  He explained that I needed…

TBI similarities

Interesting thing about TBI – traumatic brain injury and PTSD – Post Traumatic Stress Disorder is they have many similarities in recovery.  Occasionally, they are interchanged and more than one source asserts that PTSD is a traumatic brain injury.  My daughter researches her challenges of recovering from a brain tumor removal.  This article on Emotional…

Cellular Level

Why can’t I get away from my memories? Written on our mind and in our bodies these bundle of cells lurk waiting to be reactivated when a smell, sight, sound, touch or taste hit that hot button and fire off a flashback.  The evidence is piling up from research and personal experience.  I didn’t remember…

Layers of nightmares

My sister shared this article with me on Facebook, thanks Judy.  http://www.militarytimes.com/story/military/advice/kevlar-for-the-mind/2016/07/11/hopeful-sign-combat-veterans-nightmares-insomnia/86937384/ Shares a method called ERRT – Exposure, Relaxation, and Rescription Therapy This method is not new.  What is new they are starting to test it.  The frustrating part is no one can make money off of this because it is not a new…

Smashing things all together

My counselor lectured me often (read that as at least once or twice a month for 7 years) about lumping/smashing/tangling things all together.  He taught me to pull apart problems and separate them into parts.  For example, I would complain about some event at work.  He would help me sort through what was knee-jerk reaction…